Q1B6 Industrial Revolution DBQ

Flora Tristan was a 19th-century French activist and a member of the lower working class. In 1843, she wrote The Workers’ Union.


1. Consolidation of the working class by means of a tight, solid, and indissoluble [indivisible] Union.
2. Representation of the working class before the nation through a defender chosen and paid by the Workers’ Union, so that the working class’s need to exist and the other classes’ need to accept it become evident.
3. Recognition of one’s hands as legitimate property. (In France 25,000,000 proletarians have their hands as their only asset.)
4. Recognition of the legitimacy of the right to work for all men and women.
5. Recognition of the legitimacy of the right to moral, intellectual, and vocational education for all boys and girls.
6. Examination of the possibility of labor organizing in the current social state [social conditions].
7. Construction of Workers’ Union palaces [buildings] in every department, in which working-class children would receive intellectual and vocational instruction, and to which the infirm and elderly as well as workers injured on the job would be admitted.
8. Recognition of the urgent necessity of giving moral, intellectual, and vocational education to the women of the masses so that they can become the moral agents for the men of the masses.
9. Recognition in principle of equal rights for men and women as the sole [only] means of unifying humankind. . . .

Source: Flora Tristan, The Workers’ Union, University of Illinois Press (adapted)
Based on this document, state two changes in society that Flora Tristan believed were needed for the working class
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6 Comments

  1. Recognition of the urgent necessity of giving moral intellectual, and vocational education to the women of the masses so that they can become the moral agents for the men of the masses. consider the women was Flora Tristan believe that was needed for the working class

  2. Recognition of the legitimacy of the right to work for all men and women.Recognition of the legitimacy of the right to moral, intellectual, and vocational education for all boys and girls. Recognition of the urgent necessity of giving moral, intellectual, and vocational education to the women of the masses so that they can become the moral agents for the men of the masses.

  3. 1. Recognition of the legitimacy of the right to work for all men and women.
    2. Recognition of the legitimacy of the right to moral, intellectual, and vocational education for all boys and girls.
    Recognition of the urgent necessity of giving moral, intellectual, and vocational education to the women of the masses so that they can become the moral agents for the men of the masses.

  4. Recognition of the urgent necessity of giving moral, intellectual, and vocational education to the women of the masses so that they can become the moral agents for the men of the masses. Lastly recognition of the legitimacy of the right to moral, intellectual, and vocational education for all boys and girls.

  5. 1.Recognition of the legitimacy of the right to work for all men and women.
    2.Recognition in principle of equal rights for men and women as the sole means of unifying humankind
    3.Recognition of the legitimacy of the right to moral, intellectual, and vocational education for all boys and girls.
    4.Recognition of the urgent necessity of giving moral, intellectual, and vocational education to the women of the masses so that they can become the moral agents for the men of the masses.

  6. 1.recognition in principle of equal rights for men and women as the sole means of unifying humankind
    2.recognition of the legitimacy of the right to work for all men and women ~Nakyia walker


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